Strong Reactions

December 30, 2018

by Steve Stofka

Happy New Year!

Dramatic trading days signal a down market. In the week prior, the SP500 index lost over 7%. On Monday, Christmas Eve, the stock market fell to a level that would traditionally signal the beginning of a bear market, which is 20% below a recent high closing price. After a huge rally on Wednesday and a lot of volatile trading this week, the index gained 3%.

A disruptive stock market underscores the importance of asset allocation. The SP500 has lost 10% in December. A conservatively balanced fund like Vanguard’s Wellesley Income (VWINX) lost 1.8%. The fund is actively managed and has 40% stocks, 60% bonds/cash. A fund of index funds, VTHRX, lost 7.8%. It has a more aggressive mix of 65% stocks and 35% bonds/cash.

As I noted a few weeks ago (Hat Trick), there have been repeated signs of a struggle between hope and fear, between competing estimates of future earnings. 7% weekly price falls occur at crises or turning points. In the past sixty years, there have been only fifteen such weeks. Let’s take a look at the most recent.

In August 2011, then President Obama walked away from an informal budget deal with House Speaker John Boehner. The market lost almost 20% but fell short from hitting that mark. Once a budget deal was negotiated, the market recovered but it took five months to make up the losses.

SPY4YR2011-2018

Three years earlier, in October 2008, the market lost more than 7% in a week when negotiations for a bank bailout fell apart. This was a month after the bankruptcy of investment firm Lehman Brothers ignited the financial crisis. The market would take 39 months to recover that October price level. On February 17, 2009, President Obama signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Note #1). Senate Democrats made many concessions to win a few Republican votes for the bill to gain passage. Once it became clear that the stimulus funds would be trickled into the economy over several years, the market tanked, losing 11% during the month of February. In a final week of capitulation, the market lost 7% in the first week of March. This was the turning point.

A 10% weekly price drop in April 2000 heralded the end of the dot-com boom. The market would not recover for 83 months, almost seven years. An even worse fall came after the market opened following the 9-11 attack. The indictment of the international accounting firm Arthur Anderson sparked doubts about the financial statements of other companies and helped fuel an 8% drop in July 2002.

With six weeks of 7% price drops, the 2000s was the most tumultuous decade since the Great Depression. Strong reactions in the market deserve our attention and caution.

//////////////////////
Notes:
1. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s